AMAZING TAP HANDLES!!!

About This Site

Welcome to Amazing Tap Handles - The Tap Handle Museum. Here you will find photos of the Museum's collection of beer taps, along with brewery info. Have a look around the Museum, and use the contact form in sidebar to leave me feedback about the site, talk about taps, or if you have a rare tap handle you'd like to sell to the Museum. I'd love to hear from you! Please, no inquires about buying taps - they're not for sale.

Copyright Legalities

Photos or tap descriptions used in this blog may not be misrepresented as your own. Photos may not be used for financial gain whatsoever, as the uniqueness of the photo would unfairly associate a seller's product and reputation with this site. Tap descriptions may be used word for word as long as this blog is cited as the source, and a link is provided to this site.

Brewery history may not be used for any reason without citing the blog post or original source from which it was taken, and providing a link to such.

Failure to follow the guidelines above is a violation of Copyright Law, which protects original works of ownership.

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Friday, November 20, 2020

The Museum Turns 9 Years Old Part 3: Top 15 Taps Acquired This Year

The subject of the top taps I acquire within a year continues to be one of my most popular posts, so it was an easy choice to not only bring it back again this year, but also to expand it from a top 10 list to a top 15. Although the number of tap purchases that I made were lower this year, the number of scarce taps that I acquired were higher than most other years. This is an opportunity to share some of my favorite, hard-to-find acquisitions with my readers when you wouldn't see them otherwise for years. I've already profiled many great new acquisitions from partnerships with breweries this past year, such as Smashin' Crab, Three Huskies, Liquid Alchemy, Gatlinburg, Millstream, Flying Machine, Torque, Industry, and Wonderland. Since those taps have already appeared on the site, in this post I'm going to focus on other taps I acquired that have not been profiled yet. Click through to see the taps, which have been presented in no particular order...

Thursday, November 12, 2020

The Museum Turns 9 Years Old, Part 2: Individual Tap Statistics

In Part 2 of my series of anniversary posts, it's time to take a look at individual tap statistics. To revisit the concept, I'm listing which taps generate the most page views on the site. I've divided the rankings based on the year that I profiled the tap, so I've listed the 20 taps with the most views for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, Year 4, Year 5, and Year 7. Since fewer taps were profiled in Year 6, Year 8, and Year 9 (this year), only the top 10 will be ranked for those years. The number in parenthesis is the previous year's ranking if different than the current year; "NR" means the tap was not on the list last year. The first tap on the list has the most views, and the other taps follow in descending order.


There was a little shuffling within each year, although only year 8 had new entries. Year 2 and Year 8 also had a new #1. In fact, the Moddy Brew taps have captured the top spots in back to back years, with Gorgon Conquest taking this year's top spot. The most surprising change was the Sapporo Samurai sword displacing the Pabst Pink Elephants to take the top spot in Year 2.

Click through to see the lists..

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

The Museum Turns 9 Years Old, Part 1: Site Summary and Statistics

Another year, another set of anniversary posts to celebrate the founding of the Museum and this blog. This first post takes a brief look at the past year, a few thoughts about the upcoming year, and site statistics.

Click through to read more...

Sunday, November 8, 2020

Tap Handle #764: Lost Coast - Watermelon Wheat

Tap size:  10.5"

Rarity:  readily available

Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut


Following the Lost Coast Arrgh! tap profile comes another offering from Lost Coast, Watermelon Wheat. Why is that? Well, several years ago when this tap first came out, I wasn't originally going to purchase it, but when it and the Arrgh! tap went on sale, I found that if I purchased both I could get free shipping, which sealed the deal. It features a large slice of watermelon sitting on top of watermelon vine leaves. Below that is the name of the beer in sculpted, recessed letters. A large bunching of wheat stalks is above the brewery signage, while the shaft of the tap has some bas relief wheat stalks sculpted in to it. There's no real front or back, but there are some subtle differences between the two main sides, such as the watermelon seeds and also the wheat stalks on the shaft. It's a nice enough tap, but was not designed by Duane Flatmo, so it differs stylistically with most other Lost Coast taps, and while the colors are appropriate for the subject matter, the green/red/tan color scheme is a bit jarring. A better choice would have been a representation of the character that actually appears on the label. The tap is still available from the brewery, but feels a bit overpriced at its regular cost for what it is (it reminds me of the Shock Top taps, but without the Shock Top character). Watch for brewery store sales to pick it up cheaper with free shipping opportunities if you spend over a certain amount, or you can usually find it on the secondary market for less than the brewery's stock price.


For more about Lost Coast, see this post.


Click through to read more about Lost Coast's Watermelon Wheat and to see more photos of this sweet-looking tap...

Saturday, November 7, 2020

Tap Handle #763: Lost Coast - Arrgh! Pale Ale

Tap size:  11"

Rarity:  readily available

Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut


This is one of my favorite Lost Coast taps, which I picked up several years ago during a sale on the brewery's web store. As is the case with many of their labels and taps, it was designed by artist Duane Flatmo. It features a colorful but crazy-looking parrot who sports an eye patch and a small hat with a skull on it. This fellow is perched on a hook, with the name of the brewery below that, and on the base is a label with the name of the beer on it. Combined with the name, there's no mistaking the pirate theme going on here. The tap is not rare; first produced in 2015, there have been many made over the years; in fact you can easily find it on the brewery's web store, as well as the secondary market.

For more about Lost Coast Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Lost Coast's Arrgh! Pale Ale and to see more photos of this dashing tap...

Saturday, October 31, 2020

Tap Handle #762: Wonderland Brewery (Brazil)

Tap size:  11"

Rarity:  imported tap, less than 10 seen

Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut


Wonderland character cards

Many thanks to the fantastic people at the Wonderland Brewery in Brazil for getting one of these taps into my hands. I'm not 100% sure but I believe this is the first tap handle I've profiled from South America. It was quite a unique experience, as my brewery contact and I conversed entirely in Brazilian Portuguese. Even after I had purchased the tap, Wonderland followed up to make sure that I not only received the tap, but that I liked it. The answer is a resounding yes! There are so many small details that are easily recognizable to anyone familiar with Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, which the brewery is themed after. On one side of the tap is a small bottle that says drink me, some playing cards, mushrooms, and pocket watch. I consider this the "front" side of the tap (I'll explain this shortly). On the other side is a small door, a book, and a croquet mallet and ball. At the top of the tap is a sign bearing the name of the brewery, above which is a spray of red roses. In a very unique feature, there are no labels or signage that have the name of the beer variety; instead, a slot under the brewery name allows an oval-shaped card to be inserted (see image to right). These cards are artistic versions of characters from Alice in Wonderland, and each character is tied to a beer. For example, the character of Alice represents the brewery's Curiouser and Curiouser American IPA (which I will be profiling here). The side that the character card is inserted in I have designated as the back of the tap...the reason why is that the lip of the card holder can be seen when displayed. However, when looking from what I consider the front, the lip is not visible; only the character art can be seen looking "through" the center of the tap. This is clever reference to the sequel to Alice in Wonderland, titled Through the Looking-Glass. Less than a half dozen have appeared on the secondary market, and when they have, they command a price well over $100.


Editor's Note: contrary to some claims I have read, this tap is not associated in any way with Wonderland Brewing Company in Colorado. I visited the Colorado brewery last year in person and can confirm that they have no ties to the Brazilian brewery nor to this tap.


Click through to read more about Wonderland Brewery, their Curiouser and Curiouser American IPA, and to see more photos of this wondrous tap...

Sunday, September 27, 2020

Tap Handle #761: Original Sin - Elderberry Cider

 


Tap size:  11.25"

Rarity:  cider possibly retired, hand-made

Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt


Back in profile #673 I mentioned that Original Sin had released two taps featuring a woman, a snake, and a piece of fruit that corresponded to the cider's flavor variety. That first tap was was Apricot, and this second one I'm profiling is Elderberry. First appearing around 2014, this tap, like the Apricot tap before it, once again evokes images of the Garden of Eden (except with elderberries instead of an apple), and it is beautifully sculpted and painted. The raven haired beauty sits on top of a round sign that has the name of the cidery, the cider variety, and the cidery's symbol sculpted into it. I would estimate that perhaps 20 to 30 of these have appeared on the secondary market since their initial release. It commands a premium price (well over $100).

For more about Original Sin, see this post.

Click through to read more about Original Sin's Apricot Cider and to see more photos of this sinfully good tap...

Monday, September 21, 2020

Tap Handle #760: Original Joe's - Red Ale

Tap size:  11"

Rarity:  less than 10 seen

Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt


As promised, here is the third in the set of Original Joe's I acquired together, Red Ale. Featuring a red-headed girl in pigtails, a green top and blue shorts, she sits on the OJ's standard base. The name of the brewpub appears in raised letters, and under that is the word "Red", also in raised letters, while "Ale" runs down to the bottom of the base. It bears some similarities to the Original Joe's Blonde; she is sitting with her body and legs facing left, and according to the mark on the back, this tap was first produced in 2011. Like all Original Joe's taps, it is very rare for the Red Ale to come up in the secondary market, and when it does, it sells for an exorbitant price.

For more about Original Joe's see this post.

Click through to read more about Original Joe's Red Ale and to see more photos of this shapely tap...

Sunday, September 13, 2020

Tap Handle #759: Original Joe's - Honey Brown

Tap size:  11"

Rarity:  less than 10 seen

Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt


As I mentioned in my previous post, I managed to acquire a set of three Original Joe's taps at one time. This is the second of the three taps. Like the Blonde Ale, this one features a young woman (with brown hair of course) perched on the OJ's standard base. The name of the brewpub appears in raised letters, and under that is the word "Honey", also in raised letters, while "Brown" runs down to the bottom of the base. It differs from the Original Joe's Blonde in that this girl sits with her body and legs facing right, and according to the mark on the back, this tap was first produced in 2012. Like all Original Joe's taps, it is very rare for the Honey Brown to come up in the secondary market, and when it does, it sells for an exorbitant price.

For more about Original Joe's, see this post

Click through to read more about Original Joe's Honey Brown and to see more photos of this attractive tap...

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Tap Handle #758: Original Joe's - Blonde Lager

Tap size:  11"

Rarity:  less than 10 seen

Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This is the second Original Joe's tap that has appeared in the Museum. There will be actually two more profiles immediately following this one, since I picked up this and the other two together as a set. Unlike the previous Original Joe's Light, which had a surfboard as the base, this tap features what I call OJ's standard base. The name of the brewpub appears in raised letters, and under that is the word "Blonde", also in raised letters, while "Lager" runs down to the bottom of the base. According to the mark on the back, this tap was first produced in 2011. Like all Original Joe's taps, it is very rare for the Blonde to come up in the secondary market, and when it does, it sells for an exorbitant price.

For more about Original Joe's, see this post

Click through to read more about Original Joe's Blonde Lager and to see more photos of this shapely tap...

Sunday, August 30, 2020

Tap Handle #757: William Grant & Sons - Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum


Tap size:  9.25"
Rarity:  promotional, fragile
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

I had been holding off on profiling my Sailor Jerry tap due to some damage to it, so when a version in good condition came into my hands through a fellow collector, I figured it was finally time to give the tap its due. This hula girl playing a ukulele is one of the more well-recognized designs that Norman "Sailor Jerry" Collins produced, as it appears on the label of every bottle of Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum. She stands on a round base, painted metallic gold, in which the name of the rum appears. This "label" is actually either silkscreened or painted on and is practically impossible to repair when damaged...and the taps are easily abused, as they received heavy use at special promotional events - you won't find Sailor Jerry Rum on tap in your local bar. It's uncertain whether the taps are still being produced; I picked up my original tap back in 2015 but I didn't really see them start hitting the secondary market until 2018. Since then the volume has increased quite a bit. Initial prices hit as high as $465 before dropping to a more reasonable $150-$300 range over the past year. A shorter "shotgun" version of the tap exists and also commands a premium price on the secondary market.

Norman Keith Collins (January 14, 1911 – June 12, 1973), known popularly as Sailor Jerry, was a prominent American tattoo artist in Hawaii who was well known for his sailor tattoos. As a child in the early 1920s he hopped freight trains across the country and learned tattooing from a man named "Big Mike" from Palmer, Alaska, originally using the hand-pricking method. In the late 1920s he met Tatts Thomas from Chicago who taught him how to use a tattoo machine. Collins practiced his tattooing skills on bums in return for cheap wine or a few cents. At age 19, Collins enlisted in the United States Navy. During his subsequent travels at sea, he was exposed to the art and imagery of Southeast Asia. When Collins mustered out of the Navy, he settled in Honolulu. At the height of WWII, over 12 million Americans served in the military and, at any given moment, a large number of them were on shore leave in Honolulu. Hotel Street was a district comprised almost exclusively of bars, brothels and tattoo parlors, and was where Collins, as Sailor Jerry, built his legacy. Ironically, Collins was deeply influenced by the culture that started the war in the first place - the Japanese. The most proficient and sophisticated tattoo artists of the times were the Japanese masters known as Horis. Collins became the first Westerner to enter in regular correspondence with these masters, sharing techniques and tattoo tracings.


Collins made significant contributions to the art of tattooing. He expanded the array of colors available by developing his own pigments. He created custom needle formations that embedded pigment with much less trauma to the skin. He became one of the first artists to utilize single-use needles. His tattoo studio was one of the first to use an autoclave to sterilize equipment. Yet tattooing was just one dimension of his life. He continued to pursue his maritime interests as captain of a three-masted schooner that toured the islands, and had his own radio show called Old Ironsides. Collins was out on his Harley when he had the heart attack that would take his life. He asked that upon his death, his shop be passed on to his proteges, Don Ed Hardy and Mike Malone. If neither took the place over, Jerry left instructions it was to be burned to the ground. Malone took possession of the shop and ran it for almost 25 years. Every year since 2015, a Sailor Jerry Festival is observed in Honolulu.


Click through to read more about Sailor Jerry's Spiced Rum and to see more photos of this iconic tap...

Saturday, August 15, 2020

Tap Handle #756: Mad River - John Barleycorn Barley Wine Ale

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  none
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Like that of the previous profile, North Coast's Puck, here is another tap with English folk origins: Mad River's John Barleycorn Barley Wine. It's quite an unusual tap, with a design that is influenced by the ale's designation as a harvest celebration ale by the brewery. A vaguely human face is surrounded by tall stalks of wheat, all in tones of brown and black, which imaginatively captures the character of John Barleycorn as a personification of barley cultivation. The name of the brewery appears at the top, while the beer name appears on a sculpted ribbon around the center of the tap. The front and back of the tap are identical to each other so I have reduced the number of photos taken. This beer has been brewed annually for almost 30 years, but the tap has only been around for the past 7. It occasionally appears on the secondary market; originally it sold for over $100 but prices have dropped to half of what they once were.

John Barleycorn is a British folk song dating back to the sixteenth century, and the character of John Barleycorn in the song is a personification of the important cereal crop barley and of the alcoholic beverages made from it, beer and whisky. In the song, John Barleycorn is represented as suffering indignities, attacks and death that correspond to the various stages of barley cultivation, such as reaping and malting. The most popular modern version of the song was recorded by the rock group Traffic on their 1970 album John Barleycorn Must Die.

John Barleycorn info provided courtesy of Wikipedia.

For more about Mad River, see this post.

Click through to read more about Mad River's John Barleycorn Barley Wine Ale and to see more photos of this fertile tap...

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Tap Handle #755: North Coast - Puck the Beer

Tap size:  12"
Rarity:  fragile
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

First brewed in 2013 to celebrate the brewery's 25th anniversary, in 2014 North Coast's Puck the Beer became a permanent addition to the brewery's offerings. Initially the tap for the beer was a plain, almost ball-style knob (see photo to right). In 2016, the full figural tap was produced in order to give the beer its due, and in 2017 a shotgun version of the same tap was also produced. It is named after a spirit of English folklore and additionally is a famous character in a Shakespeare play. The design of the tap is unusual in a couple of ways and I'd love to learn more about what inspired it. First, the styling of the base of the tap looks like a fluted column, but it also appears as if there are windows at the very bottom, and it appears as if a building is sitting on top of the column with puck figures on each corner. In some ways it does bear a strong resemblance to the Puck Building in New York. Second, the tap has four sides which are all identical, so I only took photos of one side. Third, the puck figures on top have an oblong shape to their heads that join in the center...it is so unusual that I took a photo of the feature from a top down view. The name of the beer features prominently on a label at the top of the tap, with the beer style also on a label that sits between the building and the column. Finally at the base is yet another label bearing the brewery's logo. While there are a lot of fine details in the design, there are many edges and corners that are prone to wear and chipping, making a used tap in good condition hard to find. Fortunately, though the tap does not appear in the brewery's online store, new in box versions are readily available for great prices on the secondary market.


In English folklore, Puck is a domestic and nature sprite, demon, or fairy. Puck may also be called "Robin Goodfellow" or "Hobgoblin", in which "Hob" may substitute for "Rob" or "Robin". Addtionally, the term "pixie" is in origin a diminutive of puck. Like other fairy creatures such as brownies or sprites, Puck might do minor housework, fine needlework, or butter-churning for you, which could be undone in a moment by his knavish tricks if you displeased him. He may also do work for you if you leave him small gifts, such as a glass of milk or other such treats. Medieval brewers did not understand the science behind the reaction of yeast in brewing beer, which was instead attributed to magic (called "barm"). The brewers often thought that Puck would help or hinder the making of beer by providing or withholding the barm. The most commonly known Puck/Robin Goodfellow is one of the main characters in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Puck appears prominently in many art pieces, and multiple sculptures can be found featuring him, including 2 on the Puck Building in New York City...the building was named after and housed the office of the 19th-century humor magazine Puck, and is currently owned by Jared Kushner, son-in-law of U.S. President Donald Trump. The character still makes modern appearances in television and literature: in the Amazon series Carnival Row, the Puck are a race of fae; also, Puck is a significant character who goes by Robin Goodfellow in season three of the Netflix series The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.


Puck information and photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

For more about North Coast Brewing see this post.

Click through to read more about North Coast's Puck the Beer and to see more photos of this classically styled tap...

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Tap Handle #754: Four String: Brass Knuckle Pale Ale

Tap size:  12" tall x 3.75" wide
Rarity:  brewery closed
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

I purchased this tap from Four String Brewing at the same time as the previous tap, the Dan Cochran Signature guitar. Brass Knuckle is not the most figural tap - it's brass knuckles attached to a post - but it is distinctive. The tap measures 3.75" wide from the post to the edge of the brass knuckles, something to keep in mind if you want to acquire one but have space limitations. The top of the post has a golden/brass color that looks like bands circling the post, with a small decorative knob on top. At the base is a sign bearing the name of the brewery and the beer. This tap is easily found on the secondary market and very affordable. While Four String was a good sized brewery that made a significant amount of beer, since they have closed I would expect the supply of this tap to eventually dry up.

For more about Four String Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Four String's Brass Knuckle Pale Ale and to see more photos of this punchy tap...

Thursday, July 16, 2020

Tap Handle #753: Four String - Dan Cochran Signature

Tap size:  11.75"
Rarity:  brewery closed
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

As a hobbyist guitar player I enjoy picking up a guitar-themed tap now and then. I acquired this Four String tap directly from the brewery several years ago, and it fits the guitar theme well, as it features the likeness of the head and neck of a bass guitar. On the head of the guitar is a label bearing the brewery's logo, their name, and that it was based in Columbus, Ohio. On the back is a nearly identical label, except that it is cut into a different shape. Tuning keys and fret bars round out the additional details. Labels featuring the beer variety where placed lengthwise along the guitar neck (see example to the right). I'll be profiling their Switchblade IPA. The tap has appeared on the secondary market with less frequency since the brewery closed its doors, but it can still be picked up for a fairly inexpensive price.

Click through to read more about Four String Brewing, their Switchblade IPA, and to see more photos of this shreddin' tap...

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Tap Handle #752: Industry Brewing

Tap size:  9"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Many thanks to Industry Brewing's VP, Christa, for selling a tap to me for entry into the museum. And this is one freaky tap! An arm holds up a small tray, and a skull sits on top of the tray. The name of the brewery runs along the arm in large, raised red letters. At the base, both front and back, is an area where a decal can be placed to indicate the name of the beer; the tap is used for all of the brewery's beers and the decal indicates the beer variety (I'll be profiling their No Call No Show APA, which has a label that goes well with the tap). The tap design very closely resembles the brewery's logo. Why did they choose such a strange and unique design? I have no idea, but if I find out later I will update this post. I've only seen one of these on the secondary market, where it was incorrectly identified as belonging to a different brewery.

Click through to read more about Industry Brewing and to see more photos of this imaginatively Gothic tap...

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Tap Handle #751: Liquid Alchemy Beverages (LAB)

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Many thanks to the CEO of Liquid Alchemy Beverages (LAB), Terri Sorantino, for giving me the opportunity to purchase this fantastic tap for entry into the Museum. Conceptualized as a beaker sitting on top of a Bunsen burner, the tap is quite colorful and full of amazing details throughout the design. For instance, note the "liquid" (mead? honey?) splashing out of the top of the beaker, or the silver apple at the very top that is made of metal and has a cutaway section where a magnetic label can be placed...or even all of the small hexagons sculpted into the surface of the beaker. There is a red sign just above the Bunsen burner with LAB's name on it. The tap is used for all of LAB's offerings; the label determines the variety (I'll be profiling their Thai-Grrr Mead). I've only seen one of these appear on the secondary market at the time this profile was written.

Click through to read more about Liquid Alchemy Beverages, their Thai-Grrr Mead, and to see more photos of this inventive tap...

Monday, April 27, 2020

Tap Handle #750: Torque - What the Helles

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  unique "corrugated" wide/low profile ferrule

Many thanks to Matthew Pinette, the Tap Room Manager of Torque Brewing, for selling me a tap for entry into the Museum when I reached out to him back in January. This one has a really nostalgic feel to it, reminiscent of classic gas station ads featuring a cheerful service station attendant, ready to help pump your glass and clean your windshield. The gas attendant is done in bas relief style, while the gas pump is fully figural. The brewery's name can be found on the attendant's hat, and it can also be found at the base of the tap with the date of the brewery's founding and the words "always fresh" and "purveyors of craft beer". At the top of the gas pump is a place for a label; I requested a label for the brewery's hilarious "What the Helles" lager. The bottom ferrule is uniquely designed and resembles corrugated metal. If you look closely at the paint job on the gas pump, there are fine, light-colored flecks of paint that give the pump a metallic appearance. The front and back are reverse images of each other. They have appeared on the secondary market but so far the volume has been fairly low.

Click through to read more about Torque Brewing, their What the Helles beer, and to see more photos of this nostalgic tap...

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Tap Handle #749: Flying Machine

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

From the moment I saw this tap I really wanted it, and many thanks to Zack at Flying Machine Brewing for allowing me to acquire onefor the Museum. The brewery combines a "muted steampunk" theme with elements of the flying machine made famous by the Wright Brothers, and the tap reflects that theme. At the top is an old world globe with a metal band encircling it. Attached to the band is an airplane and the name of the brewery. The shaft is shaped like a fluted column. Below the globe and attached to the column is a large rectangular block where a label can be placed or the beer variety can be written with a marker (I'll be profiling their Empire of Air Hazy IPA). Under that is a steampunk symbol featuring gears and wings. I have not seen another.

Click through to read more about Flying Machine Brewing, their Empire of Air Hazy IPA, and to see more photos of this innovative tap...

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Tap Handle #748: Millstream Brewing

Tap size: 11.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

It's always a delight to find a tap, be it old or new, that allows me to profile a brewery with a great story. Millstream was one of the first microbreweries in the U.S., and yet I was amazed I had not heard of them. I think you'll enjoy reading about their history, and their tap is pretty special as well. This one came my way courtesy of a club member and one of the owners, Teresa Albert. It features a tranquil scene, with a mill and waterwheel at the top, and water flowing from the wheel down the front of the tap, between green fields and over sculpted stones. A large signage area in the middle of the tap sports the name of the brewery around a circle where a label can be placed to display the beer variety (I'll be featuring their legendary Schild Brau). On each side are the words "Craft Brewing Since 1985", over what looks like stacked brown foundation stones. The back of the tap is similar to the front, but the rear of the building gives it a slightly different look. I've not seen one of these on the secondary market.

Click through to read more about Millstream Brewing and to see more photos of this idyllic tap...

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Tap Handle #747: Gatlinburg Brewing

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

I've known about this tap for a couple of years, but it only just recently became available to me thanks to a couple of club members and owner Steve Wilson. It features a bear dressed for the outdoors, with a camera in one paw and a big frothy beer in the other. As if the character wasn't unusual enough, he also possesses a long white beard and mustache. The bear's ears poke through his hat and his tail pokes through the seat of his pants. On the back of each shoe that the bear is wearing are the initials GBC. At the base is a large round area where a label bearing the brewery name is found, on both the front and the back. There is no label for the beer variety; the tap is used for all of the brewery's beers (I'll be profiling their Don't Feed the Bears Brown Ale). There's currently one on the secondary market but the price is extremely high; other than that one, I haven't seen another.

Click through to read more about Gatlinburg Brewing and to see more photos of this tap of unusual character...

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Tap Handle #746: Einstök - White Ale

Tap size:  10.75"
Rarity:  import, tap out of production
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

The double-bladed axe tap handle produced by Einstök Brewing in Iceland is influenced by the Viking people who settled Iceland in the late 9th century. The shaft of the axe bears the name of the brewery on all 4 sides, and includes the brewery's symbol (a silhouette of a helmeted Viking). Above the name, front and back, are elaborate patterns sculpted into the tap, while turning the tap to the side reveals the name of the beer variety, which is also sculpted. The beer variety can be difficult to spot due to the dark blue lettering on the dark grey background. Since the front and back are identical to each other, I have reduced the number of photos taken. This tap is no longer used by the brewery; instead, they have switched to a flat metal version that uses stickers for beer variety. Because this tap is retired, it is much harder to find than the current metal tap, but it is still fairly affordable when it appears on the secondary market.

Click through to read more about Einstök Brewing, their White Ale, and to see more photos of this very sharp tap...

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Tap Handle #745: Berghoff - Genuine Dark

Tap size:  8.5"
Rarity:  beer variety no longer produced
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This tap first appeared around 2006, tying it to the year in which Mountain Crest bought Joseph Huber Brewing Company (who was contract brewing Berghoff beers) and renamed it Minhas Brewing. Although several copies of this tap have cropped up on the secondary market over the years, this is one of only 3 or 4 that I've seen that had a label attached for the beer variety. The label gives the tap some extra character, as it humorously presents itself as a name tag. The tap itself, made of acrylic, looks like a glass of beer, right down to the dozens of little bubbles inside of it. The backside is flat. Since there isn't a lot of detail, I did not take any close up photos. Although the tap is a bit simplistic, I wanted it because of Berghoff's long and unique history, which was quite a challenge to piece together. I mentioned above that several of these have appeared on the secondary market over the years, although it's not clear if the tap is still currently in production. In addition to missing the label, several of these that have been presented for sale are scratched, as the acrylic, though fairly durable under normal use, is soft enough to be easily scratched.

Click through to read more about Berghoff, it's Genuine Dark beer, and to see more photos of this storied tap...

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Tap Handle #744: Budweiser - Bronze Hunting Dog

Tap size:  7"
Rarity:  about 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

In the past I profiled a series of taps from Budweiser that share a common theme: a bronze colored sculpting on a wide base, with a label wrapped around it. These consist of the baseball player (tap profile #69), the bronco rider (tap profile #72), the football player (tap profile #85), the bull rider (tap profile #78), and the Clydesdale (tap profile #331), which are all part of what is referred to as the Heritage Collection. These are among the oldest taps I have, as you can tell by some of the low profile numbers. However, there is a sixth tap that is far more elusive, and took me a long time to acquire: this hunting dog. Like the Clydesdale tap, this one's a little on the small side, but the detail is impressive. As I mentioned above, the hunting dog is difficult to find. It is unknown how many were made, and for what specific purpose, but it appears that the first few that appeared back in 2006 (the year of manufacture) sold for a reasonable price. By 2015 the scarcity, combined with the desire of buyers looking to complete their Heritage Collection, had pushed it over the $100 mark, where it is still valued today - if you can find one.

For more about Budweiser, see this post.

Click through to see more photos of this sought-after tap...

Friday, January 3, 2020

Tap Handle #743: Moddy Brew - Gorgon Conquest Red Ale

Tap size: 12"
Rarity:  limited to 100 made
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

The first tap profile of 2020 comes directly from Moddy Brew. This has to be one of the most beautiful and amazing taps I've ever seen. It features a red-haired girl slaying a Medusa, also known as a Gorgon. As a big mythology and history buff, I am totally mesmerized by this tap! The sculpting and colors are exquisite, and if you look closely there are all kinds of minor details, such as bugs on the rocks at the base, snakes moving up the shaft of the spear, and sculpted patterns in the armor of the girl and the Gorgon.

Last July I did a profile on Moddy Brew's first tap, Deep Troubles. In that post I explained how I was struck by the the fact that you cannot see the girl's face...yet now the girl's face is visible. This is significant and you can find out what I learned as you read more of the write up.

The labels (pictured, right) are meant to be applied over the "M B" on the oval shaped stone just below the Gorgon. As was the case with the first tap, only 100 of these taps have been made, and each comes with a certificate of authenticity. You can order this tap through Moddy Brew's Facebook page, and it can also be found on eBay (search for "Moddy tap"), while supplies last.

For more about Moddy Brew, see this post.

Click through to read about the mysterious reveal behind the design and to see more photos of this legendary tap...

Monday, December 30, 2019

Tap Handle #742 - Three Huskies

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, nanobrewery
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Thanks go out to one of my club members, as well as Justin Henderson, the owner of Three Huskies Brewing, for getting this tap into my hands and thus into the Museum. At the top of the tap is a place for labels; the upper label is shaped like a paw print with the brewery's initials in the center. Below that is a place for a label with the beer variety that goes over the brewery's logo (see photo to right...I'll be profiling the brewery's Snow Nose Scotch Ale.) The rest of the tap consists of, appropriately, the likeness of three Huskies, who gave the brewery its name. They include Justin's two dogs Akira and Aurora, and also Stella, which belonged to Justin's parents, Todd and Mary. The dogs each face a different direction, providing all sorts of display opportunities. Only a couple of these taps have appeared on the secondary market and have commanded a premium price.

Unfortunately Stella passed away since the brewery opened, but she is remembered in the logo and tap handle. Skye is the newest member of the brewery's pack, ensuring that the name Three Huskies is still very much appropriate.

Click through to read more about Three Huskies Brewing, their Scotch Ale, and to see more photos of this tap full of character...

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Tap Handle #741: Fegley's Brew Works

Tap size:  11.5"
Rarity: readily available, fragile
Mounting:  custom 3/8" ferrule on 3/8" anchor bolt

Although the Fegley's tap has been around for quite some time, it took awhile for me to get my hands on a decent one. The first one I purchased off the secondary market arrived broken in several pieces. Months later, so did a second one. I wasn't having much luck getting through to the brewery, but then I stumbled across this brand new one for a great price. Finally, Fegley's gets their Museum profile! I really like the look of the tap, with lots of gears and pipes that pay homage to the steelworkers who worked in the same town that the brewery is in. At the top of the tap is the brewery's name, with an 8 pointed, compass-like star below that, which is the brewery's symbol. Halfway down the tap is a large black circle within a gear, where beer labels are placed (I'll be profiling their Hop'solutely Triple IPA). The unique custom ferrule at the bottom is a nice touch. The front and back of the tap are reverse images of each other. These are easy to find on the secondary market and the price is usually very reasonable. With all the corners and gear edges that are exposed, the taps can be easily damaged so prospective buyers should examine taps closely.

Click through to read more about Fegley's Brew Works, their Hop'solutely Triple IPA, and to see more photos of this industrious tap...

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Tap Handle #740: Cervecería Cuauhtémoc-Moctezuma - Dos Equis Lager Especial

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  fragile, import
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Way back in 2014, tap profile #396, I presented a Dos Equis Ambar Masquerade tap. This Lager Especial tap is the companion piece. It took me some time to find one at a decent price that did not have any damage to it. In that profile I explained that these taps were created in 2013 as part of a Halloween promotion that included a contest to win a trip to Miami and be in the Dos Equis Ultimate Masquerade Party. The promo ran from September 1st to October 31st, 2013. This tap, and its companion red tap for Ambar, were initially limited and hard to come by, but over the years they have popped up on the secondary market at times, usually for an affordable price. It's important to look for damage, however, as the many ridges and corners found on the tap tend to take abuse.

For more about Cervecería Cuauhtémoc-Moctezuma and their Dos Equis brand, see this post.

Click through to read more about Cervecería Cuauhtémoc-Moctezuma's Dos Equis Lager Especial and to see more photos of this masquerading tap...

Friday, December 20, 2019

Tap Handle #739: Smashin Crab

Tap size:  10.75"
Rarity:  readily available
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This tap comes to the Museum thanks to the efforts of a collectors club member, as well as Autum, one of the owners of Smashin Crab. It's a fantastic and beautiful tap featuring the restaurant's logo at the top: a crab with a mallet inside of a life preserver. The tap itself looks like a weathered pier, with rope near the top and seaweed at the bottom. A brass colored frame on the base surrounds the name of the restaurant, which appears as a decal in white lettering. Regarding the design and use of the tap, Autum provided me with the following:

"The most interesting thing about the Smashin Crab Tap Handle is that it was NOT designed for beer or a brewery at all! They were made to be used to dispense our Signature Cocktails. There were initially 8 taps produced for the first 2 restaurants. The pieces were designed and executed by Steel City Tap Co. out of Birmingham, AL. Producing such a detailed design for the very small order was met with much opposition, but Smashin Crab was very persistent in getting the work done. Around a year later, 100 more taps were commissioned to accommodate for growth in the San Antonio market and for future franchising. 

The piece has taken on a life of it's own, with interest of collectors across the country without having stepped foot in any Smashin Crab location. The copper plates were created by our handy man to put the final touch of class on our bar display."

If you would like to purchase your own Smashin Crab tap handle, send Smashin Crab a message via their website contact form, or through their Facebook site. The cost is $115.

Click through to read more about Smashin Crab and to see more photos of this smashingly good tap...

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Tap Handle #738: Furnace Room - Wright House Red Ale

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This is the fourth and final Furnace Room tap that I will be profiling. The Wright House Red Ale tap handle's main feature is a column of red brick. At the top is decal with the name of the beer. Below that, a vintage steam engine protrudes from the brick structure. Under that is a decal with the words "red ale" against a white background, and at the very bottom is the label bearing the brewery's name. Sculpted streams of steam come off the the engine's smokestack and wrap all the way around to the back of the tap. On the sides, below the brick, are the flame decals that are the brewery's symbol and are seen on some of the other Furnace Room taps. I hate to sound like a broken record, but I have never seen a Wright House tap on the secondary market, and as I have stated previously, Furnace Room's production brewery has only been open for a year, so it's possible some of these could pop up in the future.


The Wright House (located across the parking lot from the Furnace Room Brewery) dates back to the early 20th century. Originally called The Railway Exchange Hotel, and then later The Station House Hotel, it was built by John Higgins, who saw the opportunity to cater to traffic created by eighteen passenger trains passing through Georgetown daily right on his doorstep. Higgins was married to George Kennedy's daughter (Kennedy was Georgetown's founder) and had the resources for construction. The building was purchased in 1913 by experienced hotelier Harry Wright. With the heavy rail traffic, and two paper mills directly across the tracks, the hotel was serving sometimes 200 meals daily during peak periods. The Grand Trunk Railway used the Exchange Hotel for passenger accommodation when a train accident occurred locally. The Wright family often supplied blankets to stranded passengers who were satisfied to sleep on the floor during emergencies. Harry Wright’s grandson, Glen Wright Hillock, was one the last family members to operate the hotel which closed in 2003. Like the former McGibbon Hotel in the downtown core, plans are underway for the old Station House Hotel to be partially preserved and provide accommodation to a new generation of Georgetown residents. Habitat for Humanity has recently purchased the site with hopes of constructing four townhouses.


Remnants of the Wright House circa 2017
For more about Furnace Room Brewery, see this post.

Click through to read more about Furnace Room Brewery's Wright House Red Ale and to see more photos of this landmark tap...

Sunday, December 15, 2019

Tap Handle #737: Furnace Room - Dynamo Cream Lager

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This is third of four taps I'm profiling from Furnace Room Brewing. Dynamo Cream Lager features a large turbine consisting of black, copper and brass colors, with black hoses on top of a normal-looking base. The front and back are reverse images of each other. Like the previous two taps I profiled, the Dynamo tap has a decal on the base bearing the beer name, while the brewery's name appears at the bottom on a label. And like the Chicken Man tap, the base has another decal on each side featuring a flame, the symbol of the brewery. I love the industrial look of the turbine/dynamo on the top half of the tap. I have never seen a Dynamo tap on the secondary market, but as I have stated previously, Furnace Room's production brewery has only been open for a year, so it's possible some of these could pop up in the future.


Built in 1888, the first electrical power station in Georgetown, Ontario was constructed by John R. Barber. The Barber brothers bought a wool mill and foundry along the Credit River in 1837, with the intent to turn it into a paper mill. They named the settlement which was quickly growing nearby 'Georgetown' (it was formerly called 'Hungry Hollow'). The converted wool mill began to use and produce rag paper. James Barber took over sole ownership of the mill from his 3 brothers; later, control of the mill passed to his son John. With the growth of the famous Canadian Grand Trunk Railway, and John's innovations, the mill switched over to wood pulp, employing hundreds of workers on almost 12.5 acres.

Remnants of the Credit River Dynamo
By this point, business was good enough that they were able to commission the construction of a hydro station several kilometres upstream, realizing the power that could further be harnessed from the Credit River. By damming the river, he created a waterfall that powered the turbines that ran the Dynamo. Remnants of the Dynamo and the dam are still visible today. The paper mill was the first business in North America to use long-distance power, and made many contributions to almost every aspect of Ontario's paper industry.

Barber's paper mill info courtesy of Jonathan Castellino at blogTO. Info on the Credit River Dynamo and still image (from video) courtesy of AuroraRon's video on Youtube.

For more about Furnace Room Brewery, see this post.

Click through to read more about Furnace Room Brewery's Dynamo Cream Ale and to see more photos of this historic tap...

Saturday, December 14, 2019

Tap Handle #736: Furnace Room - Beardmore Kolsch

Tap size:  10.75"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  custom flared 3/8' ferrule

This is the second of four taps I'm profiling from Furnace Room Brewery. This one features a large blue-faced head, with the most striking aspect being the long blonde beard. The head, which represents a man named George Beardmore, sits on top of a black base, which itself represents the Beardmore water tower in Georgetown, Ontario. As on the previous tap profiled Chicken Man, the Beardmore tap  has a decal on the base bearing the beer name, while the brewery's name appears at the bottom on a label, and the colors appear to be an artistic choice. This one is just slightly more more rare than the Chicken Man, as I have never seen a Beardmore tap on the secondary market, but as I have stated previously, Furnace Room's production brewery has only been open for a year, so it's possible some of these could pop up in the future.


Beardmore Tannery circa 1918
George Beardmore was born in Islington, London, England, on February 16, 1818. At the age of 14 he sailed from Bristol to Canada. He returned to England briefly in 1838, heading back to Canada in 1839 with his younger brother, Joseph, in tow. In 1840 the two brothers built the first stone tannery building in Canada, in Hamilton. The Beardmores worked hard and expanded and created a successful leather business. On the night of July 11, 1840, disaster struck when the tannery was destroyed by fire. Joseph Beardmore's health failed and he returned to England in 1846. He died 6 years later at the age of 33. George was able to re-established himself in Toronto, where he engaged in business as a leather merchant and at the same time continued to supply the trade in Hamilton. He then bought a small tannery at Grand River which was later destroyed by fire. Next, he bought a tannery in Guelph. In 1865 he closed shop in Guelph and headed to Acton, where he purchased the Sessions, Toby and Co. tannery in 1865. His four sons joined him into the business. In 1872 a fire destroyed most of the buildings but the Beardmores were able to rebuild. By 1899, after briefly moving to Muskoka and then returning to Acton, the Beardmore tanneries had a million square feet of floor space, the largest tanning operation in the British Empire. The iconic Beardmore and Co. water tower stood high above the many buildings that covered the 160-acre site.


The Beardmore Tannery was closed in 1986 and most of the buildings were taken down by the Mennonites in 1998. This picture of the Beardmore Tannery water tower (see left) was taken around 1995. The Old Hide House is located in one of Beardmore's warehouses. In 1974 Acton was amalgamated with the Town of Georgetown and incorporated as the Town of Halton Hills.

Beardmore information courtesy of Hidden Ontario: Secrets from Ontario’s Past by Terry Boyle; Halton Images; and www.eureka4you.com.

For more about Furnace Room Brewery, see this post.

Click through to read more about Furnace Room Brewery's Beardmore Kolsch and to see more photos of this iconic tap...

Friday, December 13, 2019

Tap Handle #735: Furnace Room - Chicken Man Pale Ale

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, import
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This tap comes to the Museum courtesy of a collectors club member and Mike Glockner, one of the owners of Furnace Room Brewery. It is the first of 4 taps that I will be profiling from the brewery. The Chicken Man tap features a man holding a chicken behind the handlebars and tire of a bicycle, along with the front portion of a crate. On the shaft below is a decal bearing the beer name, while the brewery's name appears at the bottom on a label. On each side of the shaft is another decal featuring a flame, the symbol of the brewery. Except for the label and decals, the rest of the tap is colored in shades of green. Why green? I can't be certain - it may just be an artistic decision - but I will share that information if I get it. The Chicken Man was an actual real person as you will see below, and all of Furnace Room's beers, art and taps are themed off of places or legends in their hometown of Georgetown, Ontario. I've only seen one of these taps appear on the secondary market, so it is currently quite rare, but Furnace Room's production brewery has only been open for a year, so it's possible more of these could pop up in the future.

The Chicken Man is the nickname of an actual person named George Chaplin. He became a cult figure in Georgetown, Ontario where he used to ride his bike around town, transporting his pet chicken named "Cluck Cluck" everywhere he went. Originally the chicken was contained by a green milk crate on the front of his bike. After Chaplin took a particularly nasty spill one day, Cluck Cluck was moved to a crate on the back of the bike. Chaplin was a friendly person who would stop and talk to anyone, adding to his cult status. On one blog, a post titled "10 signs you grew up in Georgetown" listed #7 as: "You consider the Chicken Man both a local celebrity and a friend." According to some reports, Chaplin passed away in 2013.

Click through to read more about Furnace Room Brewery, their Chicken Man Pale Ale, and to see more photos of this legendary tap...

Monday, December 2, 2019

Tap Giveaway #15 - Results

This contest closed without any entries. I will have another contest sometime next year. For now, it's back to more tap profiles...

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Tap Giveaway #15 Announcement

It's time for another tap giveaway! This will be the 15th contest that the Museum has sponsored. Previous tap contest entries and winners were:

#1 - East Coast Taps nautical theme - won by Denis G. (out of 3 entries received for trivia contest)
#2 - Florida Keys mermaid - won by Sean W. (out of 6 entries received)
#3 - Big Dawg - won by Charlie W. (out of 4 entries received)
#4 - Beer Army - won by Ariel N. (out of 15 entries received)
#5 - Beer Army #2 - won by Larry C. (out of 14 entries received)
#6 - Red Hook Seedy Blonde - won by Bill S. (out of 13 entries received)
#7 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by John P. (out of 12 entries received)
#8 - Shiner Smokehaus - won by Graham B. (out of 12 entries received)
#9 - Haacht Rince Cochon - won by Blair B. (out of 15 entries received)
#10 - Hobgoblin (new style) x 2 - won by Patrick M. and Doug K. (out of 22 entries received)
#11 - Celt Thirsty Warrior - won by Jeff H. (out of 16 entries)
#12 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by Ken M. (out of 5 entries received)
#13 - Small Town Brewery Not Your Father's Root Beer - won by Al L. (out of 13 entries)
#14 - Small Town Brewery Not Your Father's Root Beer - won by Martin A. (out of 13 entries)

Market value of taps given away to date: approximately $770

I'm giving the winner their choice of one of the following three taps:


Tap #1: Leinenkugal IPL - The tap is new and unused in its original box. This is the same tap given away in contests #7 and #12. It is made to look like a wooden post with signs nailed to it.












Tap #2: Rivertown Pumpkin - The tap is new and unused in its original box. This is the same tap you'll find in profile# 586.













Tap #3: Pabst Old Tankard Ale - The tap is new and unused in its original box.












To enter the contest, you need only submit your name through the "Contact Me" feature in the sidebar, or email me if we've been in contact previously. In a bit of a change from previous contests (since I'm on a time constraint) I will choose one winner at random on Monday, December 2nd, so you have until Sunday, December 1st, 11:59 pm PST to enter. Once I announce the winner they will have 48 hours to respond to my email or I will choose a new winner. The two taps which are not chosen will be used for future giveaways. Good luck!

Friday, November 22, 2019

The Museum Turns 8 Years Old, Part 4: Upcoming Tap Profiles

A couple of years ago I added a new feature that was essentially a sneak peak of upcoming profiles. Although some of those profiles still haven't made an appearance due to various reasons, I felt that the topic was worth revisiting. Last year I was only able to profile 5 of the 10 taps I had chosen. Click through to find out which additional 5 taps I hope to profile over the next year...

Saturday, November 16, 2019

The Museum Turns 8 Years Old, Part 3: Top 10 Taps Acquired This Year

"Top 10 Taps Acquired This Year" is a feature I debuted last year, and it turned out to be one of my most popular posts, so I thought I'd bring it back again this year. It's an opportunity to share some of my favorite acquisitions with my readers when you wouldn't see them otherwise for years. I've already profiled many great new acquisitions from partnerships with breweries this past year, such as Mission Springs, Labyrinth, Freigeist Bierkultur, Lake Monster, True Vine, Departed Souls, Karbach, Ghostface, South Beach, and Moon Under Water. Since those taps have already appeared on the site, in this post I'm going to focus on other taps I acquired that have not been profiled yet. Click through to see the taps, which have been presented in no particular order...

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

The Museum Turns 8 Years Old, Part 2: Individual Tap Statistics



In Part 2 of my series of anniversary posts, it's time to take a look at individual tap statistics. To revisit the concept, I'm listing which taps generate the most page views on the site. I've divided the rankings based on the year that I profiled the tap, so I've listed the 20 taps with the most views for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, Year 4, Year 5, and Year 7. Since fewer taps were profiled in Year 6 and Year 8, only the top 10 will be ranked for those years. The number in parenthesis is the previous year's ranking if different than the current year; "NR" means the tap was not on the list last year. The first tap on the list has the most views, and the other taps follow in descending order.

There was a bit of movement for each year, although only a little at the top spots. Year 5 had a new #1, while Year 6 was unchanged. As expected, Year 7 saw a lot of movement, with 4 new taps on the list, and an octopus and kraken in the top 2 spots.

Click through to see the lists..

Monday, November 11, 2019

The Museum Turns 8 Years Old, Part 1: Summary and Statistics

Another year, another set of anniversary posts to celebrate the founding of the Museum and this blog. This first post takes a brief look at the past year and what I hope to accomplish over the next year, plus site statistics.

Click through to read more...

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Tap Handle #734: Wildrose

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

I purchased this tap from a friend and fellow club member who gave me a great deal on it, and I wanted it badly. The detail on this tap is incredible...it is basically a three sided tap, with a skull on each side. Underneath each skull is a pink colored rose. A sign on the front top has the name of the brewery, while another sign under the rose says "Brewing". The skulls, roses and signs are attached to a rust-colored, leather-clad post in the center that has barb wire wrapped around it. The tap has so much character, and the skulls definitely lend a morbid, creepy factor - but in a cool way, of course - this is a highly desirable collectible! No beer variety is found on the tap; instead it is used for all of the brewery's varieties (I'll be profiling their Mad Cow Milk Stout). This was one of the ten taps I was looking forward to profiling in my anniversary post from last year, so I'm happy to finally get it done. This tap has certainly been pretty scarce, with only perhaps a half dozen appearing on the secondary market at premium prices.

Note: Wildrose Brewing is not to be confused with Wild Rose Brewery, which was a Canadian brewer that was eventually consumed by Sleeman.

Click through to read more about Wildrose Brewing, their Mad Cow Milk Stout, and to see more photos of this incredible tap...

Monday, November 4, 2019

Tap Handle #733: Snowshoe - Weizen (Snoweizen)

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  none
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

I'm taking a brief respite from recent brewery acquisitions to return to posting a couple of older taps. This tap is a classic from Snowshoe Brewing. To my knowledge it first appeared around 2007 or 2008, and their are several variations depending on variety. Featuring a snowshoe, appropriately enough, what differentiates the tap varieties are the names of the individual beers in raised, sculpted letters on banner that appears in a few different colors such as red, blue and green. There is also a variety that simply says "Snowshoe" with no beer name. Weizen is an older beer name that is now referred to as Snoweizen. Since the front and back are nearly identical (there are very minor differences), I've reduced the number of photos taken. It's a great tap to display next to Snowshoe's Grizzly tap, which I posted about in profile #511. They do pop up on the secondary market from time to time but the price has been wildly unpredictable.

For more about Snowshoe Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Snowshoe Brewing's Snoweizen and to see more photos of this chill tap...