AMAZING TAP HANDLES!!!

About This Site

Welcome to Amazing Tap Handles - The Tap Handle Museum. Here you will find photos of the Museum's collection of beer taps, along with brewery info. Have a look around the Museum, and use the contact form in sidebar to leave me feedback about the site, talk about taps, or if you have a rare tap handle you'd like to sell to the Museum. I'd love to hear from you! Please, no inquires about buying taps - they're not for sale.

Copyright Legalities

Photos or tap descriptions used in this blog may not be misrepresented as your own. Photos may not be used for financial gain whatsoever, as the uniqueness of the photo would unfairly associate a seller's product and reputation with this site. Tap descriptions may be used word for word as long as this blog is cited as the source, and a link is provided to this site.

Brewery history may not be used for any reason without citing the blog post or original source from which it was taken, and providing a link to such.

Failure to follow the guidelines above is a violation of Copyright Law, which protects original works of ownership.

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Friday, May 17, 2019

Tap Handle #721: Crying Eagle - Louisiana Lager

Tap size:  11.75"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This is the third and final Crying Eagle entry, and once again it is a tap supplied by friend of the museum Morgan C. It features an image of the state of Louisiana at the top, with a water scene - complete with cattails and a dock - on the base of the tap, sculpted in bas relief. The purple, blue, and pastel color scheme is gorgeous and vivid. Unlike the previous two taps from Crying Eagle that I have profiled, I have actually seen one of these appear on the secondary market for a very reasonable price.

For more about Crying Eagle, see this post.

Click through to read more about Crying Eagle's Louisiana Lager and to see more photos of this beautiful tap...

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Tap Handle #720: Crying Eagle - Hop Blooded IPA

Size:  12"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Here comes another tap from friend of the Museum Morgan C. and Crying Eagle. This one represents a collaboration between the brewery and the legendary rock band Foreigner, with the name being a play on the title of one of the bands songs, "Hot Blooded". It features a large hop at the top of the tap, with blood vessels sticking out of it as if the hop were a heart. Those blood vessels extend into the lower part of the tap, where hops and hop leaves are sculpted in bas relief. A sign in the middle of the tap bears the name of the brewery and the beer variety. Like the previous Crying Eagle tap I profiled, Pistol Bridge, this tap is also fairly new and I haven't seen another.

Foreigner is an English-American rock band, originally formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran English musician and ex-Spooky Tooth member Mick Jones, and fellow Briton and ex-King Crimson member Ian McDonald along with American vocalist Lou Gramm. Jones came up with the band's name as he, McDonald and Dennis Elliott were British, while Gramm, Al Greenwood and Ed Gagliardi were American. They are one of the world's best-selling bands of all time with worldwide sales of more than 80 million records, including 37.5 million records in the US. The band's debut, Foreigner, was released in February 1977 and sold more than four million copies in the United States, staying in the Top 20 for a year with such hits as "Feels Like the First Time", "Cold as Ice" and "Long, Long Way from Home". Their second album, Double Vision (released in June 1978), co-produced by Keith Olsen, topped their previous, selling five million records and spawned hits in "Hot Blooded", the title track "Double Vision" and "Blue Morning, Blue Day". Album number three, Head Games (September 1979), co-produced by Roy Thomas Baker, which was referred to by Gramm as their "grainiest" album, was also successful because of the thunderous "Dirty White Boy" and another title track hit "Head Games". The next album was recorded at Electric Lady Studios in New York City with producer Robert John "Mutt" Lange, engineered by Dave Wittman (currently with Trans-Siberian Orchestra). 4 (released in July 1981) contained the hits "Urgent" (which includes the famous Junior Walker sax solo), "Waiting for a Girl Like You", "Juke Box Hero" and "Break it Up". Before releasing albums of his own, Thomas Dolby played synthesizers on 4 (he contributed the signature synth sound on "Urgent" and played the intro to "Waiting for a Girl Like You"). Their next album, Agent Provocateur, co-produced by Alex Sadkin, was released successfully in December 1984 and gave them their first and only No. 1 hit in 1985 (in the US, UK, Australia, Norway, Sweden, etc.), "I Want to Know What Love Is", a ballad backed by Jennifer Holliday and the New Jersey Mass Choir. The song was their biggest U.S. hit.

Foreigner information courtesy of Wikipedia.

For more about Crying Eagle Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Crying Eagle's Hop Blooded IPA and to see more photos of this hot blooded tap...

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Tap Handle #719: Crying Eagle - Pistol Bridge Porter

Tap size:  12"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This is the second tap that was supplied by friend of the Museum Morgan C., and features another Louisiana brewery, Crying Eagle. I will be featuring 3 Crying Eagle taps, and this is probably my favorite of the 3 due to the theme and colors. The tap is done in bas relief, with pistols at the top, the Calcasieu River Bridge below that, a sign featuring the brewery's name and the beer variety, and a sunset scene at the bottom with reeds and metal girders. The front and back of the tap are identical to each other, so I have reduced the number of photos taken. This tap represents one of the new core brews that the company rolled out during their rebranding in 2018, so it is very recent and I have not yet seen another.

The Calcasieu River Bridge was built between 1948 and 1952 in Lake Charles, Lousiana. Officials had planned to call it the Lafitte Bridge, after the infamous pirate Jean Lafitte, who was rumored to have buried some of his treasure in the area. About 10,572 decorative crossed pistols were originally placed as part of the bridge rail as a symbol of Southwest Louisiana's pirate history. It brings I-10/US 90 west from Lake Charles into Westlake. In the 50s, it was US 90, and was later grandfathered into an I-10 bridge. When that process took place, the federal government promised to replace the bridge, since it was not designed originally to be an interstate bridge, but that never happened. Decades later, the bridge has been rated structurally deficient by the DOT; in 2016, Travel and Leisure magazine put the bridge on the list of “America’s Most Dangerous Bridges”, coming in at number 7.


Bridge photos courtesy of SnarkyBytes.

Click through to read more about Crying Eagle Brewing, their Pistol Bridge Porter, and to see more photos of this iconic tap...

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Tap Handle #718 - Flying Tiger

Tap size:  12.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This incredible tap was supplied by a friend of the Museum, Morgan C., a Louisiana resident who was eager to get this (and a few other Louisiana taps) into my hands so that he could one day see them profiled here. I was thrilled to get the taps, so I decided Morgan should be able to see them here right away instead of waiting for years. Of the taps Morgan offered me, this Flying Tiger tap is probably my favorite, due to my personal ties to the military and aviation. It features a profile of a P40 Warhawk Flying Tiger airplane, which became the identity of the brewery due to its local ties to General Chennault, who was the commander of the Flying Tigers and lived in Monroe (where the brewery is located) for a time. The detail of the tap is impressive, from the nose art and cockpit decals to all the tiny rivets that have been sculpted across the surface. At the top of the airplane is a round sign that bears the brewery's name and logo. The tap is not variety-specific but is instead used for all beer varieties; I've chosen to profile their WarHawk Kolsch. This tap is definitely one of my favorite recent acquisitions. It's also pretty scarce since I have never seen another.


The First American Volunteer Group (AVG) of the Chinese Air Force in 1941–1942, nicknamed the Flying Tigers, was composed of pilots from the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC), recruited under President Franklin Roosevelt's authority before Pearl Harbor and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault. The aircraft were to fly with Chinese colors but be under American control. The mission was to bomb Japan and defend China but many delays meant they flew in combat after the US and Japan declared war. The AVG was largely the creation of Chennault, a retired U.S. Army Air Corps officer who had worked in China since August 1937, first as military aviation advisor to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek in the early months of the Sino-Japanese War, then as director of a Chinese Air Force flight school centered in Kunming. Meanwhile, the Soviet Union supplied fighter and bomber squadrons to China, but these units were mostly withdrawn by the summer of 1940. Chiang then asked for American combat aircraft and pilots, sending Chennault to Washington as an adviser to China's ambassador and Chiang's brother-in-law, T. V. Soong.
Chennault spent the winter of 1940–1941 in Washington, supervising the purchase of 100 Curtiss P-40 fighters and the recruiting of 100 pilots and some 200 ground crew and administrative personnel that would constitute the 1st AVG. The fighters were purchased without "government-furnished equipment" such as reflector gunsights, radios and wing guns; the lack of these items caused continual difficulties for the AVG in Burma and China. The 100 P-40 aircraft were crated and sent to Burma on third country freighters during spring 1941. At Rangoon, they were unloaded, assembled and test flown by personnel of Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO) before being delivered to the AVG training unit at Toungoo. One crate was dropped into the water and a wing assembly was ruined by salt water immersion, so CAMCO was able to deliver only 99 Tomahawks before war broke out. Shortages in equipment with spare parts almost impossible to obtain in Burma along with the slow introduction of replacement fighter aircraft were continual impediments although the AVG did receive 50 replacement P-40E fighters from USAAF stocks toward the end of its combat tour. AVG fighter aircraft were painted with a large shark face on the front of the aircraft. This was done after pilots saw a photograph of a P-40 of No. 112 Squadron RAF in North Africa, which in turn had adopted the shark face from German pilots of the Luftwaffe's ZG 76 heavy fighter wing, flying Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighters in Crete. The P-40's good qualities included pilot armor, self-sealing fuel tanks, sturdy construction, heavy armament, and a higher diving speed than most Japanese aircraft – qualities that could be used to advantage in accordance with Chennault's combat tactics.

The group consisted of three fighter squadrons of around 30 aircraft each. It trained in Burma before the American entry into World War II to defend China against Japanese forces. The group of volunteers were officially members of the Chinese Air Force. The group first saw combat on 20 December 1941, 12 days after Pearl Harbor (local time). It demonstrated innovative tactical victories when the news in the U.S. was filled with little more than stories of defeat at the hands of the Japanese forces and achieved such notable success during the lowest period of the war for both the U.S. and the Allied Forces as to give hope to America that it might eventually defeat Japan. AVG pilots earned official credit and received combat bonuses for destroying 296 enemy aircraft, while losing only 14 pilots in combat. The combat records of the AVG still exist and researchers have found them credible. On 4 July 1942 the AVG was disbanded and replaced by the 23rd Fighter Group of the United States Army Air Forces, which was later absorbed into the U.S. Fourteenth Air Force with General Chennault as commander. The 23rd FG went on to achieve similar combat success, while retaining the nose art on the left-over P-40s.

Some of the more notable members of the Flying Tigers were:

  • Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, who broke his contract with the AVG in the spring of 1942 and returned to active duty with the U.S. Marine Corps. He went on to command the "Black Sheep" Squadron and was one of two AVG veterans (the other being James H. Howard of the USAAF) to be awarded the Medal of Honor.
  • David Lee "Tex" Hill later commanded the USAAF 23rd Fighter Group.
  • Charles Older earned a law degree postwar, became a California Superior Court judge, and presided at the murder trial of Charles Manson.
  • Kenneth Jernstedt was a long-time Oregon legislator and mayor of his home town of Hood River.
  • Robert William Prescott, founder of the first scheduled cargo airline in America named Flying Tiger Line.

Flying Tiger AVG info and photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Click through to read more about Flying Tiger Brewing, their WarHawk Kolsch, and to see more photos of this decorated tap...

Sunday, April 7, 2019

Tap Handle #717: Switchback - IPA

Tap size:  13.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This tap comes to the Museum courtesy of Collectors Club member Jason C. I'll let Jason describe his contribution to the Museum in his own words:

"This tap represents Switchback's Connector IPA and it is based on the world's tallest filing cabinet. It's kind of a funny story around here and represents the fact that one of our interstates was never completed due to the amount of paperwork that blocked it. Apparently it would take filing cabinets 38 feet tall to store all the paper. It still stands near the Switchback Brewery and is visited quite often by folks traveling to the area. I've always thought it was a funny story and it made me appreciate the tap handle that Switchback created for this beer."

Many thanks to Jason for this background on the tap. I'll admit I thought this tap was a strange one, and now that I know the story behind it, it adds so much more to its character and history. It definitely represents the stack of filing cabinets that Jason mentioned (see photo below). There are drawers popped out on each side, just like they do on the real-life sculpture. The beer name appears all over the tap, but the brewery name only appears in fine print on the very bottom file cabinet, on both sides. It's a great addition to the Museum, as I have only ever seen one or two on the secondary market.



In 2002, Bren Alvarez, a 45-year-old Burlington architect (who also co-owned an art gallery), created "File Under So. Co., Waiting for...," a satirical sculpture commenting on the bureaucracy of urban planning. Over 40 feet tall, the monument sits on a vacant lot, and is essentially a stack of 11 metal filing cabinets in brown, beige, black, gray and green, with a total of 38 drawers, one drawer for every year the project had been in existence at the time of the sculpting. The drawers, some left partially open, are actually now facades that were reattached. The sculpture symbolizes the paperwork that has accumulated since 1965, when the controversial Southern Connector was first proposed to link downtown Burlington (Vermont) with Interstate 89. The purpose of the stalled beltway, which would have stretched about 2.5 miles, was to relieve traffic congestion. The cabinets are welded together and stabilized by an interior steel post. On one side, Alvarez used a blow torch to emblazon a map of the area, along with a timeline in Roman numerals that reflects the phantom road's history from 1965 to the present. Over the decades, as the project experienced one delay after another, the corridor's route and design were changed, often as a result of heated debate.

After the sculpture was completed, a 30-minute play, "Paper Highway", was developed by a local poet, and was performed at the monument's site by a cast of eight, along with the Burlington Taiko drummers. The plot of "Paper Highway" involved people in the year 2552, who find the sculpture and believe it to be an exciting archaeological discovery and an ancient shrine to the gods.

A local politician, when interviewed about the newly completed sculpture, made a bold proclamation that the Connector project would move forward in 2003, and exclaimed that the sculpture would have to be moved. As of 2019, the Connector project is dead, and the sculpture still stands. Adding another 17 file cabinets to the structure (to represent the years 2003-2019) would be incredible, but is entirely unfeasible.


Sculpture article courtesy of Seven Days.

Click through to read more about Switchback Brewing, their Connector IPA, and to see more photos of this iconic tap...

Monday, April 1, 2019

Collector Club Member Spotlight #1: Isaac and Isabelle

Welcome to my first Amazing Tap Handles Collectors Club Member Spotlight post. Here I let club members share their "origin story" about how they got into tap handle collecting. First up are Isaac and Isabelle...click through to read more about their collecting experience, in their own words, and to see photos of their collection...

Monday, March 11, 2019

Tap Handle #716: Dry Dock - Apricot Blonde (original version)

Tap size: 9.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

Back in post #329 I profiled a Dry Dock tap and also the brewery. That tap was initially released around 2012 and continues to be active to present day. Prior to that, however, the brewery used the tap you see here, which dates back to 2006. This version is well constructed and less fragile than the later one. It features a large sailing ship in bas relief, riding on sculpted waves, with an orange-colored backdrop, and is quite beautiful. The name of the brewery appears at the top of the tap as raised letters on a sculpted banner, while the variety appears on a label attached to a square signage area at the bottom front. The back is smooth, with the letters "SC" and a copyright date of '06 appearing on one side. Being an older tap with a far smaller run, this tap is much harder to find than the newer one, but typically sells for about half the cost.

For more about Dry Dock Brewing, see this post.

Click through to see more photos of this rugged tap...

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Tap Handle # 715: Lake Monster - Murmur Milk Stout

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, fragile
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This Lake Monster profile is well overdue, as I had misplaced my original that I picked up a few years ago and have not been able to locate it. Fortunately I was able to pick up another copy and give the tap (and the brewery) its due. At the top of the tap is a large square signage area with the name of the brewery on both sides. The artwork bearing the brewery's name has to be some of the coolest art ever put on a tap. I'm not sure what the shaft of the tap is supposed to be...perhaps a wooden pier? An oval sign on each side allows a label to be placed for the beer variety. But perhaps the most striking feature is the tentacle that wraps around the shaft of the tap. All the little suckers on the tentacle are a great piece of detailing. All the edges of signs and tentacles on the tap protrude out enough to make damage a possibility, usually in the form of chips. The tap has come up on the secondary market occasionally, and although the earlier ones were affordable, a well-used tap now commands a price of around $100 (or even more for a pristine copy).

Click through to read more about Lake Monster Brewing, their Murmur Milk Stout, and to see more photos of this monstrous tap...

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Tap Handle #714: Freigeist Bierkultur

Tap size:  9"
Rarity:  Less than 10 seen, import, brewed by contract brewer
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This tap comes to the Museum all the way from Germany. Freigeist translates to "Free Spirit" in English, and a ghost coming out of a snifter glass certainly seems like a free spirit. In my mind, the tap has two meanings; first, the free spirit emerging from the glass represents the brewery's craft beer style freeing German beer drinkers from the rigidity and strictness of the Reinheitsgebot, also known as the German Purity Law; and second, that this represents the brewery resurrecting recipes "long dead", those that have been forgotten due to the Reinheitsgebot or for other reasons. It's a very simple design but quite striking. I'm going to be profiling the brewery's Abraxxxas beer, one of the first they ever made. Since the front and back of the tap are a reverse image of each other, I have taken a full amount of photos. I have never seen one on the secondary market, and it should be considered quite scarce, since it is from Germany, and the brewery not only contracts their beer to made by other breweries, it doesn't even have its own website.

Click through to read more about Freigeist Bierkultur, their Abraxxxas beer, and to see more photos of this spirited tap...

Friday, February 8, 2019

Tap Handle #713: Labyrinth

Tap size:  10.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  large 3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

Many thanks to Labyrinth co-founder Sean Gaura for hooking me up with this incredible tap. I will admit to being a history/mythology buff, and played my share of Dungeons and Dragons in my youth, so this one definitely hits a sweet spot for me. The Labyrinth tap depicts the Minotaur (of Greek mythology) gripping a mash paddle while kneeling on a large block. The block has patterns carved in it that represent the Labyrinth (a maze built to contain the Minotaur). A sign on the front and back bears the name and logo of the brewery. I can't tell whether the sign is metal or is made of something else and metal-plated, but it does an amazing job of catching the light and reflecting it back thanks to the metallic sheen. In a very neat twist, the brewery's logo, which also bears an image of the Labyrinth, has a hop in the center. Why is that significant? Because from Classical times through the Renaissance, the Minotaur appears at the center of many depictions of the Labyrinth, so replacing the Minotaur with a hop in the center adds a great beer-related touch to a classical art form. There is no label; instead, the beer variety is written in the empty rectangular box under the sign, similar to a chalkboard. I'm going to profile the brewery's Pan's IPA. A large ferrule at the bottom rounds out the tap. I have to say that the amount of detail is fantastic, as is the marble appearance, and this has to be one of the top taps I've added to the collection recently. It can currently be found on the secondary market, directly from the brewery, and though it is costly, in my opinion it's worth every penny!

In Greek mythology, the Minotaur is a mythical creature portrayed in Classical times with the head and tail of a bull and the body of a man, or, as described by Roman poet Ovid, a being "part man and part bull". He dwelt at the center of the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus, on the command of King Minos of Crete. In Crete, the Minotaur was known by the name Asterion. Minos required that seven Athenian youths and seven maidens, drawn by lots, be sent every seventh or ninth year (some accounts say every year) to be devoured by the Minotaur. When the third sacrifice approached, Theseus volunteered to slay the monster. In Crete, Minos' daughter Ariadne fell madly in love with Theseus and helped him navigate the Labyrinth. In most accounts she gave him a ball of thread, allowing him to retrace his path. Theseus killed the Minotaur with the sword of Aegeus and led the other Athenians back out of the Labyrinth.

Click through to read more about Labyrinth Brewing, their Pan's IPA, and to see more photos of this epic tap...

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Tap Handle #712: Funky Buddha (Constellation Brands) - Hop Gun IPA

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity:  none
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

I wasn't actively pursuing this tap, but when it showed up as part of a group of taps I purchased, I was happy to add it to the collection. It features a profile of Buddha, based on the Spring Temple Buddha statue, with a large round area front and center, that allows a label to be attached with the brewery name and beer variety. There are no markings on the tap itself to indicate that it belongs to Funky Buddha. These were made in a variety of colors, and none of them are rare, although some of the labels can be hard to find. There are actually two versions of the tap, but the differences are in the sculpting and color...they are very minor and hard to detect. You can in fact find many of these on the secondary market at very affordable prices.


The Spring Temple Buddha is a statue depicting Vairocana Buddha located in the Zhaocun township of Lushan County, Henan, China. Construction began in 1997 and was completed in 2008. At 420 feet, including an 82 foot lotus throne, it is the tallest Buddha statue and the second-tallest statue in the world as of 2018. Taking into account the 82 foot pedestal/building atop which it is placed, the monument has a total height of 502 feet. The designer of this giant Buddha statue is Lin Shengbiao, who is a Chinese arts and crafts master. The project as a whole was estimated to cost around $55 million, $18 million of which was to be spent on the statue. It was originally estimated to consist of 1,100 pieces of copper cast, with a total weight of 1,000 tons. Beneath the statue is a Buddhist monastery. The Spring Temple Buddha derives its name from the nearby Tianrui hot spring, whose water, at 140 °F, is renowned in the area for its curative properties.

Spring Temple Buddha information courtesy of Wikipedia.


Click through to read more about Funky Buddha Brewing, their Hop Gun IPA, and to see more photos of this venerable tap...

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Tap Handle #711: Mission Springs - Fat Guy Oatmeal Stout

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Once again my dad has made a great contribution to the Museum, this time for Christmas. Using his people skills and some local contacts, he managed to secure this fantastic tap. As I've mentioned in previous posts, gas pumps make great mancave taps and this one is no different. It's got a classic look, capturing the glass dome, tall profile, hose and nozzle on the side, and the price reels of an old pump. A sign on the dome that looks almost like a license plate has the name of the brewery on it. Lower is a round area where decals can be applied for the beer variety. The label itself is under a thick, clear bubble. I've seen only one on the secondary market and it sold for well over $100.

Click through to read more about Mission Springs Brewing, their Fat Guy Oatmeal Stout, and to see more photos of this nostalgic tap...

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Tap Handle #710: Hatuey (Santiago Brewing/Bacardi)

Tap size:  12.25" tall by 4.25" deep
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  large 3/8" ferrule

In my recent anniversary post regarding upcoming profiles, this tap is one that made the list. This is mostly due to the great history of the beer, as well as the scarcity of the tap. The top of the tap depicts a likeness of Hatuey, a native of Hispaniola that fought against the Spanish Conquest and for whom the beer is named after. Below that is a four-sided sign featuring the name of the beer. The base is sculpted to make it appear as if it has ceramic and leather elements, and the ferrule is of a larger size. Overall, the tap is quite striking and very heavy. I included a depth measurement because the feathers make the tap a little deeper than other taps, and might be important to a collector with space restrictions. Mine has a few paint chips here and there but no real damage. These date to 2011 when the brewery resumed U.S. operations...not many were produced and they have become very hard to find. When they do appear on the secondary market, they typically sell for close to $200 or even double that amount.


Hatuey was a Taíno cacique (chief) originally from the island of Hispaniola (present day Haiti and Dominican Republic), who lived in the early sixteenth century and fled to Cuba during the Spanish conquest. He has attained legendary status for leading a group of natives in a fight against the invading Spaniards, and thus becoming one of the first fighters against colonialism in the New World. He is celebrated as "Cuba's First National Hero". In 1511, Diego Velázquez set out from Hispaniola to conquer the island of Cuba (Taino as it was named by Columbus). However, Hatuey had already fled Hispaniola with a party of four hundred in canoes, and warned some of the Native people of eastern Cuba about what to expect from the Spaniards. The Taino chiefs in Cuba did not respond to Hatuey's message, and few joined him to fight. Hatuey resorted to guerrilla tactics against the Spaniards, and was able to confine them for a time. He and his fighters were able to kill at least eight Spanish soldiers, which was an impressive feat given the primitive weapons of Hatuey and his fighters and the armor of the Spaniards. Eventually, using mastiffs and torturing the Native people for information, the Spaniards succeeded in capturing Hatuey. On February 2, 1512, he was tied to a stake and burned alive at Yara, near the present-day city of Bayamo.


Information on Hatuey the Taíno cacique and photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Click through to read more about Hatuey Beer and to see more photos of this legendary tap. Note that although Hatuey is supposed to be all caps, I chose not to write it up this way due to the internet etiquette of "yelling"...

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Tap Handle #709: Original Joe's - Light

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, contract beer
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This beautiful tap was featured in one of my recent anniversary posts about upcoming profiles, and as I mentioned in that post, it is my second favorite tap that Original Joe's has produced. Featuring a blond woman in a red polka dot bikini, there is a blue and white surfboard in front of her that has the symbol and name of the brewery in raised letters, and under that is the word "Light", also in raised letters. Despite the number of Original Joe's in existence, the brewery keeps tight control over all of their taps, and as a result the taps can be extremely difficult to obtain. I've seen a couple of these hit the secondary market, and they both went for over $300. Wow!

Click through to read more about Original Joe's, their Light lager, and to see more photos of this fun-loving tap...

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Tap Handle #708: J.T. Whitney's - Badger Red Ale

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, brewery closed
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This is another tap in the Bill Gibson wing (thanks Bill!), and was also mentioned in Part 4 of the "Museum Turns 7 Years Old" anniversary posts, as I was very much looking forward to telling this brewery's story. It is a tragic tale, which you can read about after the jump, in which the owner tried something illegal to save the brewery, at a great personal cost. Sometimes when we drink beer we don't think about the lives behind the scenes that are impacted by the ups and downs of the business, and this story offers a sobering perspective. As for the tap, I really love the red-eyed badger hanging over the wooden sign. Badger mascots are big in Wisconsin, where the brewery was located. The letters on the sign are sculpted for a slightly 3-D look, and they indicate the name of the beer, with the name of the brewery in smaller letters. The base is pretty plain, so I reduced the number of photos taken for some angles of the base. Since the brewery has been gone for 9 years, the tap, as you can imagine, is quite scarce - I don't think I've ever seen another.

Click through to read more about J.T. Whitney's Brewing, their award-winning Badger Red Ale, and to see more photos of this fierce tap...

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Tap Giveaway #14 Results - UPDATE

Martin has claimed his prize, so this contest is officially over.

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Thank you to the 13 participants who entered the contest in order to win a free tap. The winner of this contest, chosen at random is:

Martin A.

Martin has 48 hours to claim his prize. If he does not respond within that time frame, I will choose another winner.

If you didn't win, don't be discouraged, I'll be giving away more taps early next year!

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Tap Giveaway #14 Announcement

It's time for another tap giveaway! This will be the 14th contest that the Museum has sponsored. Previous tap contest entries and winners were:

#1 - East Coast Taps nautical theme - won by Denis G. (out of 3 entries received for trivia contest)
#2 - Florida Keys mermaid - won by Sean W. (out of 6 entries received)
#3 - Big Dawg - won by Charlie W. (out of 4 entries received)
#4 - Beer Army - won by Ariel N. (out of 15 entries received)
#5 - Beer Army #2 - won by Larry C. (out of 14 entries received)
#6 - Red Hook Seedy Blonde - won by Bill S. (out of 13 entries received)
#7 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by John P. (out of 12 entries received)
#8 - Shiner Smokehaus - won by Graham B. (out of 12 entries received)
#9 - Haacht Rince Cochon - won by Blair B. (out of 15 entries received)
#10 - Hobgoblin (new style) x 2 - won by Patrick M. and Doug K. (out of 22 entries received)
#11 - Celt Thirsty Warrior - won by Jeff H. (out of 16 entries)
#12 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by Ken M. (out of 5 entries received)
#13 - Small Town Brewery Not Your Father's Root Beer - won by Al L. (out of 13 entries)

Market value of taps given away to date: approximately $740


This contest will be the same as the previous one...I'm giving the winner their choice of one of the following three taps:

Tap #1: Leinenkugal IPL - The tap is new and unused in its original box. This is the same tap given away in contests #7 and #12. It is made to look like a wooden post with signs nailed to it.











Tap #2: Small Town Brewery Not Your Father's Root Beer - The tap is new and unused in the box. A small ship sits on top of a barrel. The base is copper colored with a beautiful extra large copper colored ferrule. This is tap that was chosen by the winner in contest #13.











Tap #3: Exile torch - The tap is used but in excellent condition in the original box. It looks like a torch that you might see on the Statue of Liberty except it's black with a gold flame, gold lettering and an extra large gold colored ferrule. There is no label and the sticker has been removed from the bottom of the ferrule; otherwise it's in great condition.









All entries for the previous tap will automatically be entered into this contest. For those who didn't enter last time, you need only submit your name through the "Contact Me" feature in the sidebar, or email me if we've been in contact previously. I'm running this contest for a shorter period due to the upcoming holidays, so I will choose one winner at random on Tuesday, December 11th, so you have until Monday, December 10th, 11:59 pm PST to enter. Once I announce the winner they will have 48 hours to respond to my email or I will choose a new winner. The two taps which are not chosen will be used for future giveaways. Good luck!

Monday, December 3, 2018

Tap Giveaway #13 Results

UPDATE

Al has claimed his prize. This contest is officially over.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you to the 13 participants who entered the contest in order to win a free tap. The winner of this contest, chosen at random is:

Al L.

Al has 48 hours to claim his prize. If he does not respond within that time frame, I will choose another winner.

If you didn't win, don't be discouraged...I'm giving away another tap next week! Everyone in this contest that didn't win will automatically be entered in the next one. Stay tuned right here for more details!

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Tap Handle #707: Newfoundland (Molson) - Moose Pale Ale

Tap size:  10.5" by 4" wide
Rarity:  less than 10 seen, beer retired, fragile
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

Back in tap profile #657, I mentioned the "Bill Gibson Wing", and how much Bill had contributed to the Museum. I'm now working through the portion of the collection that contains many of the taps that he supplied me with. Several of these are early examples of resin taps that have historical value. Moose Pale Ale is one such example, with a bas relief of the head of a moose and lots of fragile antler points attached to the tap base. There are also antler points sticking out away from the tap, creating a very unique-looking piece. The words "Moose Pale Ale" are on a decal running vertically down the base. The back of the tap is flat, with no markings indicating artist or date. There are a couple of drips of clear coat that have run down and pooled on the back, but don't affect the appearance of the front. The tap is a little wider than most at 4". It is very scarce...information was very tough to come by, since the brewery was absorbed by Molson in the 1960s, and the Moose Pale Ale brand was discontinued in the late 1990s or early 2000s, not long after this tap was made. I have only ever seen one other.

Click though to read more about Newfoundland Brewing, their Moose Pale Ale, and to see more photos of this tap...

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Tap Giveaway #13 Announcement and Details

It's time for another tap giveaway! This will be the 13th contest that the Museum has sponsored. Previous tap contest entries and winners were:

#1 - East Coast Taps nautical theme - won by Denis G. (out of 3 entries received for trivia contest)
#2 - Florida Keys mermaid - won by Sean W. (out of 6 entries received)
#3 - Big Dawg - won by Charlie W. (out of 4 entries received)
#4 - Beer Army - won by Ariel N. (out of 15 entries received)
#5 - Beer Army #2 - won by Larry C. (out of 14 entries received)
#6 - Red Hook Seedy Blonde - won by Bill S. (out of 13 entries received)
#7 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by John P. (out of 12 entries received)
#8 - Shiner Smokehaus - won by Graham B. (out of 12 entries received)
#9 - Haacht Rince Cochon - won by Blair B. (out of 15 entries received)
#10 - Hobgoblin (new style) x 2 - won by Patrick M. and Doug K. (out of 22 entries received)
#11 - Celt Thirsty Warrior - won by Jeff H. (out of 16 entries)
#12 - Leinenkugal IPL - won by Ken M. (out of 5 entries received)


For this contest I'm giving the winner their choice of one of the following three taps:

Tap #1: Leinenkugal IPL - The tap is new and unused in its original box. This is the same tap given away in contests #7 and #12. It is made to look like a wooden post with signs nailed to it.











Tap #2: Small Town Brewery Not Your Father's Root Beer - The tap is new and unused in the box. A small ship sits on top of a barrel. The base is copper colored with a beautiful extra large copper colored ferrule.










Tap #3: Exile torch - The tap is used but in excellent condition in the original box. It looks like a torch that you might see on the Statue of Liberty except it's black with a gold flame, gold lettering and an extra large gold colored ferrule. There is no label and the sticker has been removed from the bottom of the ferrule; otherwise it's in great condition.









To enter the contest, you need only submit your name through the "Contact Me" feature in the sidebar, or email me if we've been in contact previously. I will choose one winner at random on Saturday, December 1st, so you have until Friday, November 30th, 11:59 pm PST to enter. Once I announce the winner they will have 48 hours to respond to my email or I will choose a new winner. The two taps which are not chosen will be used for future giveaways. Good luck!

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

The Museum Turns 7 Years Old, Part 4: Upcoming Tap Profiles

A couple of years ago I added a new feature that was essentially a sneak peak of upcoming profiles. Although some of those profiles still haven't made an appearance due to various reasons, I felt that the topic was worth revisiting. So click through to find out the top 10 profiles I hope to get on the site over the next year...

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

The Museum Turns 7 Years Old, Part 3: Top 10 Taps Acquired This Year

Although my number of acquisitions were at an all-time low for the Museum this year, I loved the quality of the taps I acquired, and I thought it would be great to share these taps with my readers when you wouldn't see them otherwise for years. I've already profiled many great new acquisitions this past year, such as River Mile 38, Down the Road, Narrows, Sterling Pig, Swilled Dog, Eastern Shore, Snake Bite, Outer Light, Queen City, Andrews, Next Level, and multiple Parallel 49 taps. Since those taps have already appeared on the site, in this post I'm going to focus on taps that have not been profiled yet. Click through to see the taps, which have been presented in no particular order...

Saturday, November 10, 2018

The Museum Turns 7 Years Old, Part 2: Individual Tap Statistics

It's time to take a look at the individual tap statistics. To revisit the concept, I'm listing which taps generate the most page views on the site. I've divided the rankings based on the year that I profiled the tap, so I've listed the 20 taps with the most views for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, Year 4, Year 5, and Year 7. Since fewer taps were profiled in Year 6, only the top 10 will be ranked for that year. The number in parenthesis is the previous year's ranking if different; "NR" means the tap was not on the list last year. The first tap on the list has the most views, and the other taps follow in descending order.

For this go-around, there was quite a bit of movement, even for the early years, that I found surprising, although some taps are only separated by 2-3 page views. Also, one of the top taps from a previous year, Mellow Mushroom's Bogart, lost its spot, which was very surprising given that the collector's club recently selected that tap as their choice for the #1 tap.

Click through to see the lists..

Friday, November 9, 2018

The Museum Turns 7 Years Old, Part 1: Summary and Statistics

At this time time of year, every year, I like to write anniversary posts to celebrate the founding of the Museum and this blog. This first post takes a brief look at the past year and what I hope to accomplish over the next year, plus site statistics.

Click through to read more...

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Tap Handle #706: Manrock

Tap size:  11.25"
Rarity: less than 10 seen, fragile, small scale
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

Manrock Brewing's tap is cool yet creepy, featuring the Grim Reaper wielding a scythe in one hand, while the other reaches around a tombstone to hold a frosty mug of beer. It's almost as if he's saying "Don't fear the reaper, because he likes beer too!" (Sorry, I couldn't resist throwing the Blue Oyster Cult reference in there.) At the top of the headstone is the "RIP" abbreviation, while at the bottom is the name of the brewery. The Grim Reaper undercurrent is thanks to owner Mike Hiebner's heritage...the inspiration came in part from a scythe hanging in his dad’s wood shop, and Mike's family has had a longtime, playful fascination with the character, which shows up on some of the label’s packaging and especially in many of the beer names. I've chosen to profile their Apocalyptic Double IPA. Due to several sharp corners and edges, this tap is subject to damage along those edges. It is also quite rare, with very few appearing on the secondary market.

Click through to read more about Manrock Brewing Company, their Apocalyptic Double IPA, and to see more photos of this foreboding tap...

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Tap Handle #705: Next Level

Tap size:  12.5"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting: small 3/8" ferrule with set screw

I was excited when the wonderful people at Next Level Brewing hooked up the Museum with one of their taps, despite being located halfway around the world from me. They describe this tap as "a curious pirate kraken that symbolizes their focus on independent taste off the mainstream." It's fair to say this absolutely gorgeous tap is also one of the most colorful I've ever seen. The colors transition from a light blue to purple then red, in what looks like an airbrush effect. Even the one good eye shows a great attention to detail. The brewery's name is on the bottom, and there's room to place a label or write the name of a beer variety. I have chosen to profile their award-winning Lemon Thyme Gose.

Click through to read more about Next Level Brewing, their Lemon Thyme Gose, and to see more photos of this spirited tap...

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Tap Handle #704: Parallel 49 - Filthy Dirty

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Filthy Dirty is the final entry in the series of posts I have done this past week spotlighting the incredible taps of Parallel 49 Brewing. It features a pig dressed in gear that appears to cement his self-made status as a "playa", from the cap and vest, rolled up pant legs and bands on the wrists, to the gold chain with Parallel 49 medallion around the character's neck. As with the other Parallel 49 taps, this one has rarely appeared on the secondary markey and commands a very high price when it does.

For more about Parallel 49 Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Parallel 49 Brewing's Filthy Dirty IPA and to see more photos of this barnyard tap...

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Tap Handle #703: Parallel 49 - Jerkface 9000

Tap size:  10.25"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Jerkface 9000 is full of disagreeable character and is kind of creepy looking with his clown-like red hair, bulging eyes, grinning teeth, suspenders and bowtie, with his left thumb pointing at his chest. It is probably my third favorite Parallel 49 tap behind Schadenfreude and Gypsy Tears. I had to know where the name Jerkface 9000 came from, and what the inspiration for this crazy character was. As I did with the Schadenfreude tap, I turned to Steve Kitchen of Combination 13, who is the artist and designer of all of Parallel 49's labels, characters and taps. Steve provided the following response to my questions:

"Jerkface 9000 was derived from insults thrown around the brewery circa 2013...any insult with ‘9000' added was deemed too powerful to retort to, just so much extra. For the Jerkface artwork I tried to draw the most obnoxious looking guy I could think of."

In that context, there is nothing that can top a Jerkface when it is a Jerkface 9000! Many thanks to Steve for graciously answering my questions.

Like other Parallel 49 taps, this has rarely hit the secondary market and has commanded prices of $300+ when it does. I never thought I'd own one, and I'm incredibly thrilled to add it to the Museum's collection.

For more about Parallel 49 Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Parallel 49's Jerkface 9000 Northwest Wheat Ale and to see more photos of this insufferable tap...

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Tap Handle #702: Parallel 49 - Seedspitter

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

The Parallel 49 Seedspitter character is pretty strange. Water melon seed spitting contests happen across the U.S., and there's even a national event in New Orleans. That, however, involves spitting single seeds. This guy has an entire watermelon slice in his mouth and to me, he kind of invokes images of a freak show at a circus. I'm not sure why he has the whole slice in his mouth, but based on previous feedback from Steve Kitchen's designs, it's likely just a feature to make the character look more goofy. With his collared red shirt, black vest, and cowlick, this guy does look like a professional seed spitter. Similar to other Parallel 49 taps, this has rarely hit the secondary market and has commanded prices of $300+ when it does. It's yet another Parallel 49 tap that I'm excited to have and display.

For more about Parallel 49 Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Parallel 49 Brewing's Seedspitter Watermelon Wit and to see more photos of this freakish tap...

Friday, October 5, 2018

Tap Handle #701: Parallel 49 - Ugly Sweater

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

Ugly Sweater features a homely looking guy wearing what the brewery describes as "a sweater only Grandma would love." He is giving a thumbs up with his right hand, and his left hand is behind his back with his fingers crossed. It is the first Parallel 49 tap that had me guessing about what some of the design features mean. To help satiate my thirst for solving the mystery, the brewery directed me to Steve Kitchen of Combination 13, who is the artist and designer of all of Parallel 49's labels, characters and taps. Mainly I wanted to know why the character's fingers are crossed and what exactly the white figure on the front of the sweater is. Steve's response was:

"Originally when I drew the Ugly Sweater character for the label, I put his hand behind his back and thought nothing more of it. When it came to the tap handle designs later, I decided to cross his fingers just to generate more ’character’ and keep people guessing...it really doesn’t have any meaning beyond that and emphasizing his goofiness. On the front of the sweater it’s an ugly design of a Sasquatch in a snowy forest."

Many thanks to Steve for providing this insight behind the tap design!

Like other Parallel 49 taps, this has rarely hit the secondary market and has commanded prices of $300+ when it does. It's another Parallel 49 tap that I'm excited to have & display.

For more about Parallel 49 Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Parallel 49's Ugly Sweater Milk Stout and to see more photos of this fool-headed tap...

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Tap Handle #700: Parallel 49 - Schadenfreude

Tap size:  10"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

For tap profile #700, I wanted to present something special as I have in the past for tap profiles #600, #500, etc., as those numbers represent a significant milestone. Of all the Parallel 49 taps produced to date, this one is by far my favorite. Many thanks to my club members and the folks at Parallel 49 for helping me get the complete series of the brewery's taps into the Museum. Schadenfreude is the experience of pleasure, joy, or self-satisfaction that comes from learning of or witnessing the troubles, failures, or humiliation of another. Perhaps this fellow, chosen for his association with fall (since the beer is a fall seasonal), is grinning at my troubles or failures? If he is, I can live with that, because this tap is simply amazing. It features a pumpkin head scarecrow with glowing orange eyes, lederhosen and Oktoberfest cap, and even has a little owl perched next to him. The pumpkin head reminds me a little of Jack Skellington from The Nightmare Before Christmas movie. The scarecrow is attached to a wood post; in fact, there is a nail head on the back of the post that gives the impression that he has been nailed to it. The colors and sculpting of the tap are truly outstanding, and the beer it represents sounds delicious. Historically this tap has sold on the secondary market in limited numbers and for huge sums - typically over $300. I'm thrilled to have one!

For more about Parallel 49 Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Parallel 49 Brewing's Schadenfreude and to see more photos of this frightfully beautiful tap...

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Tap Handle #699: Andrews Brewing Company

Tap size:  12"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

I love this tap because of the nostalgic feel it has. The lettering of the name of the brewery, along with the color, reminds me of old motel signs or diner signs with that distinctive 1950s-1960s look that you can still find in many towns across America. The woman at the top, with her hair pulled back and wearing a one piece brown bathing suit, also evokes that feeling of nostalgia. The tap does not have labels but instead is used for all of the brewery's beer varieties, so I have chosen to profile their Leatherwood Red. As a nanobrewery with little to no distribution, these taps were not made in great numbers so they are not easy to find unless you know where to look. The price has been fairly inexpensive on the secondary market.

Click through to read more about Andrews Brewing and to see more photos of this classic tap...

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Tap Handle #698: Queen City Brewing of Cincinnati

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

This tap first appeared on this site back in July as Ohio Tap #4, posted by Associate Editor Shawn. The brewery agreed to sell me a tap of my own in exchange for a more detailed write up, and I couldn't refuse since I really wanted one. As Shawn pointed out, the tap is modeled after the Tyler Davidson Fountain, found in Fountain Square in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. The iconic statue is a symbol that is often used to represent the city, as Shawn also points out. The tap itself features "The Genius of Water", a female of heroic size, while the base is modeled loosely after the fountain's pedestal, with its interlaced vines and foliage. The front and back of the tap are identical to each other, as are the two sides to each other, so I have reduced the number of photos taken. In a curious bit of marketing, the brewery's name does not appear on the tap, and there are no labels for the base. When I asked the brewery about this, they said they they simply write the name of the beers on the base in chalk. I suspect that the tap is iconic enough that they were free of any worry about its association with their brand. The tap can be found inexpensively if you know where to look, which is a good thing, because on the secondary market it was selling for well over $100.


The Tyler Davidson Fountain is one of Cincinnati's most-visited attractions. After the death of his brother-in-law and business partner Tyler Davidson, Cincinnati businessman Henry Probasco went to Munich, Germany in search of a suitable memorial to him. Many years before, artist August von Kreling had designed a fountain to rival the great fountains of Europe but which would glorify mankind rather than fanciful creatures and mythic deities. When Miller could find no patron to sponsor the fountain, the designs languished until Probasco came to him with an interest in a similar theme. Probasco requested the addition of four figures with animals that would act as drinking fountains, which Miller's sons Ferdinand and Fritz designed. The fountain was cast in separate sections at the foundry and shipped to Cincinnati for assembly. Miller traveled to Cincinnati for the dedication ceremony, which took place on October 6, 1871, and it is estimated that 20,000 people were present. The 43-foot-tall fountain is cast in bronze and sits on a green granite base, on which appears the inscription "To the People of Cincinnati". The pedestal is square with bas reliefs of four principal uses of water: steam, power, navigation, and fisheries. Around the pedestal are interlaced vines and foliage and four figural scenes: a workman on a burning roof; a farmer standing in a field during a drought; a young girl offering water to an old man with crutches; and a mother leading her boy to the bath. Four outer figures with animals are actual drinking fountains and represent the pleasures of water using the figures of boys: one riding a dolphin, another playing with ducks, a third struggling with a snake and the fourth on the back of a turtle. The fountain square is surrounded by stores, hotels, restaurants and offices. The fountain itself is turned off during winter and turned on again in spring. It originally faced east, toward Europe, where much of Cincinnati's population originated, but when Fountain Square was redone in the late 1960s, the fountain was realigned to face west. Additional repairs and another refurbishing project was undertaken in 1999. In 2005, as part of Fountain Square's revitalization, the city decided to move the entire fountain to the center of the square. It is most familiar to non-residents for being featured in the opening credits of the television series WKRP in Cincinnati. It can also be seen in the opening narration for the paranormal investigation series Ghost Adventures.

Click through to read more about Queen City Brewing of Cincinnati and to see more photos of their inspired tap...

Monday, August 20, 2018

Tap Handle #697: Outer Light - SUBduction IPA

Tap size: 11.75"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  3/8" ferrule on 5/16" anchor bolt

Submarine taps make excellent tap handles...they just fit in the palm perfectly when pouring beer. This submarine tap from Outer Light doesn't have a lot of detail, but it doesn't need it - it's just a very solid tap with a profile that is unmistakably a submarine. The brewery's name appears on both sides of the tap as well as the bottom, while the beer name (a play on words between a submarine and a geological subduction) is featured on the two sides. It's kind of cool that if you hold the tap right side up, the beer name appears upside down. The blue and green color scheme is a new design; a previous version of the tap, which will appear here in the museum at a later date, features a red and black color scheme. This newer design seems to be scarce at the time of this entry, as I have not seen another.

Subduction is a geological process that takes place at convergent boundaries of tectonic plates where one plate moves under another and is forced or sinks due to gravity into the mantle. Regions where this process occurs are known as subduction zones. Rates of subduction are typically in centimeters per year, with the average rate of convergence being approximately two to eight centimeters per year along most plate boundaries. Subduction zones are sites that usually have a high rate of volcanism and earthquakes.

Click through to read more about Outer Light Brewing Company, their SUBduction IPA, and to see more photos of this slick tap...

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Tap Handle #696: W.G. Barr Beverage Company - T.W. Pitchers' Snake Bite

Size:  11.75"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

My camera has been fixed and I'm excited to present this Snake Bite tap that's been waiting to be profiled for quite awhile now. This has to be one of the best snake-themed taps ever produced. The detail on the snake is amazing. It is wrapped around a branch that has an apple on top, which represents the fact that Snake Bite has apple cider blended with lager. And check out the fang marks on the apple! A large gear-shaped sign has the name T.W. Pitchers', as well as the name "Snake Bite" and the words "a refreshing blend of lager & crisp apple cider".  This tap doesn't appear on the secondary market very often, and when it does it commands a high price.

Click through to read more about T.W. Pitchers' and W.G. Barr Beverage Company, their Snake Bite brew, and to see more photos of this wicked tap...

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Ohio Tap #5 - 2 Tones Brewing

2 Tones Brewing


2 Tones Brewing tap handle uses elements of the brewing process - barley and hops - as the main focal point of the tap handle. The diamond shape centerpiece allows for the handle to be interchangeable among the various beers the brewery distributes. This particular handle sticker is for the Round Town Pumpkin Ale - which has ties back to the brewery owners. 





Click through to read more about 2 Tones Brewing and Round Town Pumpkin Ale... 

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Update 7-22-18

There should be more museum posts in about a week or two. After a long, long vacation, I'm ready to get back to work, but my camera lens died and I've ordered another, which should be here on Monday. Apparently one of the chips in the old lens malfunctioned - I didn't know they could do that!

So stay tuned for some great upcoming posts featuring T.W. Pitchers Snake Bite, Outer Limit Subduction, and other great taps, plus more posts from Associate Editor Shawn...

Monday, July 16, 2018

Ohio Tap #4 - Queen City Brewery of Cincinnati

Queen City Brewery of Cincinnati Tap Handle
Queen City Brewery of Cincinnati started pouring craft beer in 2016, but their tap handle is a replica of the city of Cincinnati's most iconic symbol, which has been around since 1871. 
















Click through to read more about Queen City Brewery and the fountain it is modeled after...

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Tap Handle #695: Eastern Shore Brewing

Tap size: 11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

This nautical themed tap was acquired thanks to a club member's efforts. There is a crab at the top of the tap sitting on top of hops and wheat stalks, while another crab at the bottom reaches up to grab a hanging hop. More hops and wheat stalks appear in other places on the tap. In the center is a place for a round label; I received multiple labels and have chosen to profile Eastern Shore's Situation Critical IPA. The front and back of the tap are reverse images of each other, lending a slightly different look to when viewed from each side, so I have taken a full amount of photos. A few of these taps have appeared on the secondary market, but the supply has been dwindling, and the price has been close to or over $100 in each case.

Click through to read more about Eastern Shore Brewing and to see more photos of this whimsical tap...

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Tap Handle #694: Swilled Dog Hard Cider

Tap size:  11"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

One of my collector's club members helped me acquire this tap. I had a great conversation with Brooke Glover, Swilled Dog's Director of Sales the Marketing, about the design of the tap. There are many great features to be found on this tap, with the most prominent being the border collie laying under the apple tree which forms the main basis of the tap. The border collie's name is Lucy Pickles, and she is the cidery's mascot, representing the other dogs that the Glovers have, as well as their support of pet shelters. As the owner of two Australian Shepherds, I absolutely love this aspect of the tap. Below Lucy Pickles is a place for a round label (or a place to write a variety), and at the bottom is an apple core. Looking closely you can spot that the seeds are shaped like the state of West Virginia. At the top of the tap is the cidery's name on a big sign among the apples on the tree. It's a beautiful tap and I loved adding it to the collection.

Click through to read more about Swilled Dog Hard Cider and to see more photos of this sweet tap...

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Tap Handle #693: Tyranena - Bitter Woman

Tap size:  11.75"
Rarity:  less than 10 seen
Mounting:  internal 3/8" nut

There's not much to say about this "toy on a stick" tap. It features a very detailed head of a bitter old woman, who appears to have just finished sucking on a lemon. Below that is a label with the brewery's name and location, as well as the words "Legendary Wisconsin Beer". On the shaft, both front and back, is the name of the beer, while the sides have a decal with the name of the brewery. Price was a factor in my acquisition of this tap, because I usually don't go for toy on a stick types; however, not many of these are found on the secondary market and the price is very high for this style of tap.

For more about Tyranena Brewing, see this post.

Click through to read more about Tyranena's Bitter Woman IPA and to see more photos of this indignant tap...